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Victory! Church Freedom Passes: Texans Overwhelming Vote For Prop 3

Church Freedom Passes: Texans Overwhelming Vote For Prop 3

Austin, Texas—Late last night, Election Day proved successful for religious freedom and church protection for the new language to be added to the Texas Constitution. Results from the Constitutional Amendments Election were finalized, and Proposition 3 passed by an overwhelming margin. Proposition 3 prohibits the state from interfering with religious services and religious organizations and prevents the government from closing a church during a pandemic or any other time or for any other reason. Proposition 3, which had bipartisan support but was opposed by the ACLU, will now be officially added to the Texas Constitution. Voters across Texas made sure their voice was heard. Proposition 3 (SJR 27 by Senator Kelly Hancock and Rep. Jeff Leach) passed with 62.42% support of voters. Last year some local government officials signed executive orders that required churches to close, even the state level officials had made it clear such orders were unlawful.

Jonathan Saenz, President and Attorney for Texas Values released the following statement:

“The overwhelming message is clear from Texas voters, dont mess with our churches. Churches are essential in Texas and the words of our Texas Constitution now reflect this principle and the will of the people. We thank Senator Kelly Hancock and Rep. Jeff Leach for their leadership on this important issue and victory.”

For more information on Proposition 3, click here.

We know religious freedom is important to the people because not only was Proposition 3 passed with bipartisan support in the Texas Legislature during the regular Texas legislative session, but other bills were passed in its likeness. Earlier this year the Texas Legislature passed a bill, HB 1239, which amended Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code to protect churches in state statute. At the same time, legislators voted for similar language in the form of a joint resolution, a vehicle used by the Texas Legislature to amend the Texas Constitution. The joint resolution eventually became Prop. 3.

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